In late 2008, in an effort to get myself playing more games, I decided to play all 52 scenarios from Scenarios For All Ages by
Charles S Grant and Stuart Asquith. More than that, I decided to play them in order, 1 a week, starting on Nov 5. I knew I wouldn't
manage to play every week so I set a deadline of Dec 31st 2009. With a little help from my friends, I made it with a day to spare.

In the end, I played 52 games in 60 weeks. 34 solo games, 15 face to face games, 3 Play-by-Email mini-campaigns
17 other gamers from 4 countries participated, (Canada 11, US 4, Ireland 1, Argentina 1)

11 'periods' were played - 20/25mm Ancients (3), Prince Valiant 40mm skirmish (9), 40mm 16thC (10),
40mm semi-flat War of Polish Sucession (1), 40mm AWI (2), 40mm Pirate
Skirmish (5), 40mm early 19thC fictional (17), 15mm ACW (1), 25mm Zulu War (1),
20mm WWII (1), 20mm 1960's fictional (2)

I posted a brief report on each game on my webpage. I am shutting down my website so I am re-posting
the reports here, starting at Game #52 so that they will eventually appear in order. The reports were written in a variety of voices and tenses (sometimes all mixed together!) and it was tempting to rewrite them but I have left them as they were originally written with only very minor corrections, particularly to things like links.

To avoid copyright issues and save myself work, I have not given the details of the scenarios. Having a copy of the book will help make sense of the reports. The book may currently be purchased from John Curry at http://www.wargaming.co/ as well as from booksellers like On Military Matters and Caliver.



Sunday, October 16, 2011

18 Sep 2009 Scenario 34: Surprise 1)

This game was played solo using 40mm 16th C armies and Rough Wooing.

The English with a large force including a large number of Landsknechts and other mercenaries has trapped a small Scottish force against the Meander River. Luckily for the Scots, the mercenaries pay is late and the French are at hand with gold. A die roll settles that it is the right wing of the English army that will change sides. (Technically, this forthcoming betrayal was unknown to the English so this called for a little "lets pretend I don't know".)

On the English left, an impetuous charge of border horse sweeps away a few skirmishers but is wiped out in a fierce fight with the main body of Highlanders. These, however, are badly cut up and lurk for the rest of the battle till driven off by arquebus fire. In the center, once it becomes clear that the Germans on the right are not just hanging back due to command control failures but actually changing sides, one battle of bills and bows are turned to face them while the heavy cavalry swings forward to flank the Scottish pikes as the main battle of bills and bows advances. The Scottish cannon take a heavy toll of the Whitecoats but are eventually silenced by bow and cannon fire.

On the Scottish left, the border horse first retreat off to the far flank then swoop in to charge the English heavy cavalry from behind while a handful of Scottish arquebusiers snipe at them from the woods. Fortune favoured the Scots this day and between lucky shots and lousy morale tests, the small force of English cavalry including the General is driven back and then routed. For a moment it looks like the Redcoats will hold off the treacherous Germans on the right while the faithful Landsknechts on the left will save the day but their Cautious commander refuses to advance and as the Regent leads the Scottish pikes forward, the Redcoats crumble and the whole English line comes apart. Scotland is saved yet again

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